Libya

Massacre condemned as Libya resembles ‘wild west’


Published

Since the downfall of President Muammar Gaddafi in late 2011 there has been a steady decline in the security measures in place in Libya, to the point where it almost resembles the ‘wild west’.

A month ago the Prime Minister Ali Zeidan was briefly kidnapped and then in early June Sheikh Ahmed Zubair Senussi, head of the Cyrenaica Transitional Council, declared Cyrenaican self-government.

Throughout this year there have been clashes between militia groups all over Libya and oil exports have been affected by closure and seizure of the main ports in the east of the country by armed men associated with the Petroleum Facilities Guard.

The authority of the government has also been challenged in a number of different ways, including the establishment of the Libyan Oil and Gas Corporation by the self-styled prime minister of Cyrenaica Abdraba Abdulhameed Al-Barasi.

Much of this turmoil culminated in protests on Friday against armed militia and particularly the Misrata Brigade based in the Ghargour district of Tripoli during which the militia are believed to have fired on the protesters killing 43 people and injuring a further 460 according to the Ministry of Interior.

There were further clashes yesterday with three more people killed. Protesters are demanding that the government implement Laws 27 and 53 which require the removal of militias. Prime Minister Ali Zeidan in a 11th November press conference said that the government was struggling to recruit people for the official security forces. He went on to say that around 3,000 people had been sent for training in Turkey, Italy and the United Kingdom with a further 5,000 to be added if the recruits can be found.

Three days mourning has been declared for those killed on Friday and yesterday the Libyan Government declared a 48 hour state of emergency in the capital Tripoli.

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